When Grandpa Was A Boy, Were There Any Dinosaurs?

Tag archive: USA

Latecomers Miss Out On Lynching

1934: On 27 October, a racist crowd in the rural northwestern corner of Florida lynched Claude Neal, a black farmhand, for the rape and murder of a white neighbour, Lola Cannidy. Neal was snatched from a small-town jail, and after the niceties of mob justice and family revenge had been observed, his corpse was hanged from a tree outside Jackson County courthouse. Late arrivals for the lynching, disappointed to find that the body had been taken down, demanded that the sheriff replace it.

Source: James R. McGovern, Anatomy of a Lynching: The Killing of Claude Neal (1982), chaps. 3 and 4

Getting To Know Each Other

1932: Howard Hawks, the film director, invited screenwriter and author William Faulkner and actor Clark Gable to go dove hunting. As they drove east from Los Angeles, Hawks and Faulkner began to talk about books. Gable joined in, asking Faulkner to name the best modern writers.

“Ernest Hemingway, Willa Cather, Thomas Mann, John Dos Passos,” Faulkner replied, “and myself.”

“Oh,” said Gable. “Do you write?”

“Yes, Mr. Gable,” said Faulkner. “What do you do?”

Source: Joseph Blotner, Faulkner: A Biography (1984), pp. 309–10

Longer Lashes

Poster for D.W. Griffith's film Intolerance

Poster for D.W. Griffith’s film Intolerance

1916: False eyelashes were created for the role of Princess Beloved in the film Intolerance. Seena Owen played the princess, and the film’s director, D.W. Griffith, wanted her lashes to be long enough to brush her cheeks.

Source: www.gildasattic.com/intol.html

And In Third Place . . .

Poster for the St Louis Olympic Games

Poster for the St. Louis Summer Olympics

1904: The bronze medal in the lacrosse competition at the St. Louis Olympic Games was won by a team of Mohawk Indians, representing Canada. The team lineup included Almighty Voice, Snake Eater, Rain in Face and Man Afraid Soap.

Source: David Wallechinsky, The Complete Book of the Olympics (2004), p. 1159

Rough Justice

1903: Rather than condemn lynchings outright, The Commercial Appeal, a Memphis newspaper, contended that they should be judged on their individual merits. It was acceptable, for example, to lynch a black rapist, but wrong to lynch a black person who refused to be vaccinated.

Source: Thomas Harrison Baker, The Memphis Commercial Appeal: The History of a Southern Newspaper (1971), p. 206

Roosevelt’s Lithp

1902: “Dearest Mama . . . After lunch I went to the dentist, and am now minus my front tooth,” wrote Harvard undergraduate Franklin Roosevelt on 19 May. “He cut it off very neatly and painlessly, took impressions of the root and space, and is having the porcelain tip baked. I hope to have it put on next Friday, and in the meantime I shall avoid all society, as I talk with a lithp and look like a thight.”

One week later: “My tooth is no longer a dream, it is an accomplished fact. It was put in on Friday and is perfect in form, color, lustre, texture, etc. I feel like a new person and have already been proposed to by three girls.”

Source: Franklin Delano Roosevelt, The Roosevelt Letters: Being the Personal Correspondence of Franklin Delano Roosevelt: Early Years (1887–1904), ed. Elliott Roosevelt (1949), pp. 408–9