When Grandpa Was A Boy, Were There Any Dinosaurs?

Tag archive: Los Angeles

Refreshingly Frank

Igor Stravinsky conducting an orchestra in Warsaw in 1965

1949: The composer Igor Stravinsky and the novelist Christopher Isherwood hit if off right from the start. Stravinsky found Isherwood’s casual manner refreshing. While many reverentially addressed Stravinsky as “Maestro”, Isherwood simply called him “Igor”. Isherwood didn’t know much about music, didn’t particularly like it and didn’t pretend to. On his first visit to Stravinsky’s Los Angeles home, Isherwood fell asleep while listening to a recording of the composer’s music. Stravinsky later observed: “My affection for him began with that incident.”

Source: Peter Parker, Isherwood: A Life (2004), p.588

“Hug Me”

1965: The psychologist Ivar Løvaas reported success in his efforts to treat autistic behaviour in 5-year-old twin boys using electric shocks. In experiments at the University of California, Los Angeles, one of the boys, Mike or Marty, would be stood barefoot in a room with an electrified floor. A researcher would stand in front of him and beckon him: “Come here.” If the boy didn’t respond within three seconds he would be given a painful electric shock. After just a few sessions, the boys learned to “practically jump into the experimenters’ arms”.

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“Lawn Chair Larry”

1982: Larry Walters had always wanted to be a pilot, and on 2 July he finally achieved his ambition.

The Los Angeles truck driver bought a bunch of weather balloons, inflated them with helium and tied them to an ordinary garden chair – what the Americans call a lawn chair. He then donned a parachute, strapped himself into the chair and instructed his ground crew to release the cords that tethered his home-made flying machine to the ground.

Walters had expected to rise gently into the sky and to float about at a modest altitude; instead, he zoomed upwards at an alarming speed and drifted into the airspace over Long Beach airport.

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Getting To Know Each Other

1932: Howard Hawks, the film director, invited screenwriter and author William Faulkner and actor Clark Gable to go dove hunting. As they drove east from Los Angeles, Hawks and Faulkner began to talk about books. Gable joined in, asking Faulkner to name the best modern writers.

“Ernest Hemingway, Willa Cather, Thomas Mann, John Dos Passos,” Faulkner replied, “and myself.”

“Oh,” said Gable. “Do you write?”

“Yes, Mr. Gable,” said Faulkner. “What do you do?”

Source: Joseph Blotner, Faulkner: A Biography (1984), pp. 309–10