When Grandpa Was A Boy, Were There Any Dinosaurs?

Tag archive: Bible

Cool Chronicles

1993: The Black Bible Chronicles translated the scriptures into the language of contemporary black America. “You shouldn’t diss the Almighty’s name,” because, “It ain’t cool and payback’s a monster.” That was the Commandment warning against taking the Lord’s name in vain. “Thou shalt not kill,” became, in the idiom of Detroit and Harlem, “Don’t waste nobody,” and, “Thou shalt not commit adultery,” became, “Don’t mess around with someone else’s ol’ man or ol’ lady.”

Source: P.K. McCary, Black Bible Chronicles: Book One: From Genesis to the Promised Land (1993)

“Gryte Blytheness”

1946: William Lorimer embarked on a translation of the New Testament into Scots. The stories are familiar and the language mostly recognizable. In the Nativity, for example, Mary “wis fund tae be wi bairn bi the Halie Spirit”. Jesus was born in a stable, “sin there wis nae room for them intil the inn”. Angels brought “guid news o gryte blytheness” to nearby shepherds, who “hied owre tae Bethlehem” to see the newborn child. “Spaemen frae the Aist” followed a “stairn gaein on afore them, on an on,” and when it “stappit abuin the houss”, they went inside and fell on their knees and “wurshippit” him.

Source: The New Testament in Scots, tr. William Laughton Lorimer (2012), pp. 3, 4, 101–2

Updated Euphemism

1971: The translators of the King James Bible retained the Hebrew euphemism “to cover one’s feet”. In chapter 24 of the first book of Samuel, for instance, when David was hiding from Saul in a cave: “Saul went in to cover his feet”. Kenneth Taylor’s Living Bible updated this to: “Saul went into a cave to go to the bathroom”.

Source: Kenneth Taylor, The Living Bible (1971), p. 351