When Grandpa Was A Boy, Were There Any Dinosaurs?

Tag archive: 1962

Diplomatic Incident

1962: Pakistani mullahs made dire threats against the American ambassador to India, J.K. Galbraith; the windows of the U.S. Consulate in Lahore were broken; a jeep carrying U.S. personnel was overturned. All because of the Galbraith family’s kitten, Ahmed.

The Galbraiths had acquired the kitten during a visit to the Indian state of Gujarat. The children had originally called it Ahmedabad, after its birthplace, but later shortened its name to Ahmed. That was a mistake. Ahmed is one of the many names of the prophet Muhammad, and Muslims consider it offensive to give the name to an animal. Hence the dire threats, broken windows and overturned jeep. The ambassador made soothing noises, which dampened indignation in Pakistan. Changing the kitten’s name to Gujarat also helped.

Source: John Kenneth Galbraith, Ambassador’s Journal: A Personal Account of the Kennedy Years (1969), after p. 586

Dahl Finds Solace

Roald Dahl, photographed in 1982 by Hans van Dijk

1990: In 1962, Roald Dahl’s 7-year-old daughter, Olivia, caught measles. The virus can lead in rare cases to measles encephalitis, an inflammation of the brain that is sometimes fatal. Olivia was one of those rare cases, and the disease was fatal.

Thirty years later, as his own life drew to a close, the children’s author tenderly remembered his dead daughter and drew inspiration from her. “I am not frightened of falling off my perch,” he said. “If Olivia can do it, so can I.”

Source: Donald Sturrock, Storyteller: The Life of Roald Dahl (2010), pp. 383–8, 560

Teething Troubles

1962: America’s first space mission to another planet came to a very premature end. The Mariner 1 spacecraft was supposed to fly past Venus, but the rocket carrying the spacecraft began to behave erratically soon after lift-off from Cape Canaveral, forcing NASA to blow it up five minutes into the flight. A post-mortem attributed the failure to a missing symbol in the guidance program. Dubbed “the most expensive hyphen in history”, the omission of the symbol (actually an overline rather than a hyphen) allowed incorrect guidance signals to throw the rocket wildly off course.

Source: Paul E. Ceruzzi, Beyond the Limits: Flight Enters the Computer Age (1989), pp. 202–3

Lift-off of the rocket carrying the ill-fated Mariner 1 spacecraft

Biology Boffin

1962: Elizabeth II formally opened the Laboratory of Molecular Biology at Cambridge. The scientists had constructed models to illustrate the complexities of biological structures. The queen was very attentive. One of her accompanying ladies remarked: “I had no idea that we had all these little coloured balls inside us.”

Source: New Scientist, 31 January 1980

Classroom Chaos

1962: Adolescent girls at a boarding school in the Bukoba district of Tanganyika suddenly began to laugh and cry. No apparent reason; they just started. At first, only three girls were affected; soon, 95 of the 159 pupils had succumbed, forcing the school to close. Back in their home villages, the girls’ abnormal behaviour spread to other children and to adults. Before the epidemic subsided, hundreds were affected.

Source: The Central African Journal of Medicine, May 1963

Dirty Little Secret

First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy photographed during a visit to India in 1962

First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy photographed during a visit to India in 1962

1962: Psst! Wanna hear a dirty story about Jackie Kennedy? To cut costs at the White House, at the end of 1962 she instructed that half-empty glasses, abandoned at parties, should be refilled and passed round again, unless they had obvious lipstick marks.

Source: Sarah Bradford, America’s Queen: The Life of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis (2000), p. 280