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Tag archive: 1913

Cody’s Final Flight

1913: Residents of Farnborough who gazed overhead on the morning of 7 August will have spotted Samuel Cody’s latest flying machine trundling across the sky. In 1908 “Colonel” Cody had been the first, or one of the first, to achieve powered flight in Britain, and since then his aeroplanes had become a familiar sight above the Hampshire town. On that particular August morning, people may have noticed his biplane, and then turned away and gone on with their ordinary lives. But if they had stood and watched, they would have seen Cody’s machine suddenly buckle and break apart, fabric and wooden struts flutter down and, among the debris, in his white coat and cap, the figure of the “Colonel” tumbling towards a fatal impact with the hard earth.

Source: Garry Jenkins, ‘Colonel’ Cody and the Flying Cathedral: The Adventures of the Cowboy Who Conquered Britain’s Skies (1999), pp. 253–5

Mitford Connection

Unity Mitford, sketched by William Acton in 1937

1913: In view of her future infatuation with Adolf Hitler, it was appropriate that Unity, the fourth of the Mitford daughters, was conceived in the Canadian gold-mining town of Swastika.

Source: Mary S. Lovell, The Mitford Girls: The Biography of an Extraordinary Family (2001), p. 33

Recent Superstition

1913: It would be wrong to assume that the superstition surrounding Friday 13th is particularly ancient. Although the notions of Friday as an unlucky day and 13 as an unlucky number have longer histories, the first definite reference connecting Friday, the 13th day of the month and bad luck dates only to 1913.

Source: Steve Roud, A Pocket Guide to Superstitions of the British Isles (2004), pp. 23–5

Naughty Doggy

Albert Schweitzer, photographed in 1955 by Rolf Unterberg

1952: The 1952 Nobel Peace Prize was conferred on Albert Schweitzer for his efforts to promote “the Brotherhood of Nations”. Since 1913, Doctor Schweitzer had run a hospital in the jungle at Lambaréné, in French Equatorial Africa. He sometimes had problems keeping peace in his own back yard, let alone the world outside. Soon after the award, he had to scold a dog for chasing chickens around the hospital. “Stop that!” he roared. “Don’t you know this is a Peace Prize house? Be a Nobel dog, and quick.”

Source: News Chronicle, 8 December 1953

Day In The Country

1913: Motor cars were unwelcome arrivals in the countryside. They hurtled noisily along narrow roads, stirred up clouds of dust, frightened horses, flattened chickens. Angry peasants sometimes scattered nails and broken glass on the roads, or pelted cars with stones, or blocked their way with ropes or barricades.

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Cop That!

1913: On Easter Monday, Labour Member of Parliament J.H. “Jimmy” Thomas’s speech at the Free Trade Hall in Manchester was interrupted by a member of the audience. Edith Rigby, a suffragette, stood up, reached into her pockets and pelted Thomas with black puddings.

Source: Phoebe Hesketh, My Aunt Edith (1966), p. 70

“At The Foot Of The Cliffs I Met An Old Man”

1913: “At the foot of the cliffs,” W.N.P. Barbellion wrote in his journal on 27 June, “[I] met an old man gathering sticks. As he ambled along dropping sticks into a long sack he called out casually, ‘Do you believe in Jesus Christ?’ in the tone of voice in which one would say, ‘I think we shall have some rain before night.’ ‘Aye, aye,’ came the answer without hesitation from a boy lying on his back in the sands a few yards distant, ‘and that He died to save me.’

“Life is full of surprises like this. . . . Your own gardener will one day look over his rake and give you the correct chemical formula for carbonic acid gas. I met a postman once reading Shelley as he walked his rounds.”

Source: W.N.P. Barbellion, The Journal of a Disappointed Man and A Last Diary (1984), pp. 91–2

Nuisance Birds

1913: Gamekeepers on shooting estates in England and Scotland destroyed all birds and animals that in any way posed a threat to pheasants and their chicks.

In Adventures Among Birds, W.H. Hudson recalled a head keeper who slaughtered woodpeckers, blackbirds and thrushes because “he was not going to have the place swarming with birds that were no good for anything, and were always eating the pheasants’ food”; another keeper “shot all the nightingales because their singing kept the pheasants awake at night”.

Source: W.H. Hudson, Adventures Among Birds (1913), pp. 88, 89

Common pheasant, photographed by Dick Daniels