When Grandpa Was A Boy, Were There Any Dinosaurs?

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Limited Library

1951: James Thurber asserted that Harold Ross, editor of The New Yorker, never read anything except manuscripts for the magazine. According to Thurber, Ross’s personal library consisted of three books: “One is Mark Twain’s ‘Life on the Mississippi’; the second is a book by a man named Spencer . . . and the third is a treatise on the migration of eels.”

Source: H.L. Mencken, The Diary of H.L. Mencken, ed. Charles A. Fecher (1989), p. 136

Love Letter

1949: The death of Anne, his handicapped daughter, left Charles de Gaulle with one son and one daughter. On 10 September, de Gaulle wrote to his daughter, Élisabeth, “for no particular reason, simply to say that I love you greatly” (“Pour . . . aucune raison particulière. Simplement celle de vous dire que je vous aime beaucoup . . .”).

Source: Charles de Gaulle, Lettres, Notes et Carnets: Mai 1945–Juin 1951 (1984), pp. 374–5

Electoral Anomaly

1948: The Nationalist triumph in South Africa’s general election was an anomaly. General Smuts’s United Party and allies won 50.9 per cent of the total vote; D.F. Malan’s Herenigde Nasionale Party and allies managed only 41.2 per cent. The United Party, however, squandered too many votes on thumping majorities in urban constituencies, while the Nationalists performed strongly in rural seats whose smaller electorates required fewer votes to secure victory. When parliament reconvened, Smuts controlled 71 seats, but Malan controlled 79, sufficient for the Nationalists to usher in their policy of apartheid.

Source: Kenneth A. Heard, General Elections in South Africa 1943–1970 (1974), chap. 3

Not Welcome

1947: Canada’s Chinese Immigration Act of 1923 effectively barred Chinese immigrants. Between 1924 and 1947, when the law was repealed, Canada admitted only 44 ethnic Chinese.

Source: S.W. Kung, Chinese in American Life: Some Aspects of Their History, Status, Problems, and Contributions (1962), p. 294

Dangerous Bedding

1945: “All of a sudden,” in the early hours of 25 April, “there was a fierce air raid; the flak started raging.” Too weary to go down to the basement, the author of A Woman in Berlin snuggled beneath the bedclothes. The sheets and blankets provided “an idiotic sense of security”, as if they were made of iron. “They say bedding is extremely dangerous.” A doctor who treated a woman who had been hit in bed found that “bits of feather had lodged so deeply in her wounds he could barely remove them”.

Source: Anonymous, A Woman in Berlin (2009), p. 49

Unequal Sacrifice

1943: Hugh Dalton, president of the Board of Trade, deplored the amount of fabric used in turn-ups on men’s trousers. Turn-ups were an extravagance, Dalton said, and in wartime, civilians should make do without them.

“There can be no equality of sacrifice in this war. Some must lose lives and limbs; others only the turn-ups on their trousers.”

Source: Hugh Dalton, The Fateful Years: Memoirs 1931–1945 (1957), p. 410